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neuron-reticular-nucleus-thalamus
Multicompartment model of a reconstructed neuron from the reticular nucleus of the thalamus of a rat. The figure shows hree snapshots of activity during a burst of spikes generated by this type of cell. The distribution of membrane potential is indicated by colors: the range from -80 to +30 mV is coded from deep blue to yellow. Calcium currents located in the dendrites have a determinant influence on the properties of these cells in vitro.
Dendritic calcium currents are also essential to account for the properties of these cells seen in vivo
(from: Destexhe et al., In vivo, in vitro and computational analysis of dendritic calcium currents in thalamic reticular neurons, Journal of Neuroscience 16: 169-185, 1996).

The references of the articles and abstracts available in this database are listed below in an approximate chronological order. This work was done successively at the University of Brussels (Belgium), the Salk Institute (USA), Laval University (Canada) and at CNRS (France). The topics range from biophysical models of synaptic transmission at the main receptor types (AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, GABAB and neuromodulators), single-cell models of the electrophysiological properties of central neurons (thalamus and neocortex), as well as network models (thalamic and cortical networks).

All papers available in the database are published or in press, and are therefore subject to copyright (see publisher for authorization to reproduce). Most papers are available in PDF or postscript format (including the figures) and for all of them, an on-line abstract can be retreived.
In some cases, movie files or demos of computer simulations can be obtained.


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